Skip to main content

About your Search

English 30
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
of nelson mandela. >>> nelson mandela, dead at the age of 95. >> doreen gentzler is covering this story for us. doreen? >> jim and pat, we are learning this news in the last 15 minutes or so. this story is still developing, the reaction to it and everything. of course, there is quite a few people in washington, long time friends and supporters of nelson mandela's. as we told you, the current south african president announced mandela died at the age of 95. we have a look at the life and legacy of the leader. >> reporter: nelson mandela was the face of reconciliation and a new beginning for south africa. brian is the human rights attorney in south africa part of the movement prior to his release from prison in 1991. reflected on the role he played once he was released. it was a time celebrated around the world. inside south africa, it was a precarious time. >> immediate contribution was to reach out and speak about reconciliation. >> i cherish the idea of south africa where all south africans are equal. >> far right wing politicians are prodding them. mandela convinced the supp
>> nelson mandela as died today. it has just been announced. nelson mandela, who spent 27 years in prison. he was the first black elected president of stojakovic in 1994. let's learn more about his life. >> a freeman taking his first steps into a new south africa. >> from prisoner to president. nelson mandela's 1990 release from jail signaled the end of south africa's racist policy of apartheid. he would go on to become the untry's first true democratically elected leader. >> i, nelson mandela do here swear to be faithful to the republic of south africa. >> born to a chief of a small village, mandela was one of 13 children and the first member of his family to attend school. in the 1930's he began opposing authority and the authorities that made colored south africans second-class citizens. as white south africa became more aggressive, so did he. as the head of the armed wing of the african national congress, mandela led violent sabbatini town hall attacks and was arrested and tried in 1962. he would spend 27 years in jail, but he was never forgotten. eventually international an
nelson mandela at the age of 95. our coverage continues with the ed show. >> good evening, americans and welcome to the ed show tonight. we start with tragic breaking news. former south african president nelson mandela died at the age of 95. mandela, a remarkable life dedicated his to fighting for civil rights in south africa. mandela lived long enough to see a multiracial democratic south africa. he called it the rainbow nation. the grief over his death crossed racial lines ha he devoted his to erasing. a young man at the age of 25, he joined the african national congress in 1956. mandela was arrested with 155 other political activists and was changed with high treason. the treason trial lasted 4 1/2 years. the charges against him were ultimately dropped. mandela used a false identity to evade the government and traveled to europe and other countries in africa to built support for the anc and study guerilla warfare. when he returned to south africa in 1962, mandela was arrested and sentenced to years in prison. during his sentence, the government charmed mandela and other anc leader
you, thank you. thank you. me, thank you,h thank you, thank you, the first lady telling nelson mandela shortly after she became first lady here in america. i want to bring in our chief correspondent. this is very much a global headline with nelson mandela. mano question, this is a who has jacob zuma, the president of south africa, said the founder of the democratic republic of south africa. it was nelson mandela who created that democracy. that is the miracle that astonished the world and made him such a world figure. he was well known while he was in prison, but when he came out of prison, there was a great question about what would happen. would there be a terrible bloodbath, with they get through the passage to democracy with apartheid? it was because of nelson mandela and his character that they did. the world recognized a peacemaker, and he developed a moral stature in the world that helped him bring south africa into the world community, help them reintegrate into the world terrible it aow role in various hot spots the world. he was very close to president bill clinton. frankly,
ten days. >> mandela will be laid to rest with a state funeral sunday, december 10th. leading up to the service, zuma declared this sunday, december 8th, a national day of prayer and reflection. there will be a massive public memorial at the soccer stadium in johannesburg that hosted the world cup. he'll lie in state for three days at pretoria city hall. flags are at half staff in the capitol and white house as well, which confirmed this morning that president obama and first lady michelle obama will participate in memorial events. the guest list for his funeral will likely include every living u.s. president able to travel along with dignitaries from around the world and celebrities across the globe today, countless newspapers paying tribute. as president obama says now belongs to the ages. >> we have lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. >> and this morning, on the "today" show, former secretary of state colin powell who attended mandela's inauguration, shared what he meant to him. >> a
nelson mandela. >> nelson mandela closed a statement from the dock saying, "i have fought against white domination and i have fought against black domination. i have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. it is an ideal i hope to live for and to achieve. but if need be, it is an ideal for which i am prepared to die." nelson mandela lived for that ideal and he made it real. he achieved more than could be expected of any man. and today, he has gone home. we have lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. .e no longer belongs to us he belongs to the ages. dignity andfierce unbending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others, he transformed south africa and moved all of us. his journey from imprisonment to a president embodied the promise that human beings and countries can change for the better. his commitment to transfer power and reconcile with those who jailed him set an example that all of huma
york. nelson mandela was 96 years old and will live forever in the world. >> our beloved nelson mandela, the founding president of our democratic nation has departed. he passed on peacefully in the company of his family around 2050 on the 5th of december, 2013. he is now resting. he's now at peace. >> this is a fox news alert. former south african president, a hero, nelson mandela who's died at his johannes burg. his life is a remarkable inspiration to millions around the world. he spent 27 years in jail vowing to fight oppression, never giving up, never knowing he would get out of jail. when he finally did he became president of the nation that had imprisoned him vowing to love those that hated him eventually sharing the nobel peace price for the man who once was his oppressor. president barack obama spoke about mandela shortly after the world received the munews. >> he achieved more than expected from any man. he's gone home. we have lost one of the most influential, courageous, profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us
is that he showed us there is true freedom in forgiveness. >> we'll look at mandela's life, his policy, and how he handled criticism. it's all part of his enduring legacy. my guest, tom brokaw, civil rights leader reverend jesse jackson. and harry smith talks to poet maya angelou as she mourns a good friend. >> and that's what he brought, was deliverance and ignorance. >> i'll have all that ahead on "meet the press," sunday, december 8. >>> the world's longest running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning. it is a day of prayer and reflection in south africa as the nation mourns its former president, nelson mandela. flags are also at half staff at the white house this morning. president obama and the first lady will be going to south africa on tuesday. and former presidents jimmy carter and bill clinton will also be going to south africa this week. nelson mandela will be laid to rest this week. charlene hunter-gault who worked for npr during nelson mandela's presidency, and from newyork, special correspondent tom brokaw. here is tom back in 1990 inte
rest this week. charlene hunter-gault who worked for npr during nelson mandela's presidency, and from new york, special correspondent tom brokaw. here is tom back in 1990 interviewing nelson mandela after he was released from prison. it's a great photo. the reverend jesse jackson is here, one of the first people to greet mandela after he was released from prison. what a great day that was. we'll talk about it. and he wrote a book entitled "mandela's way." and charles ogletree who marched for mandela's freedom and subsequently met with him several times. welcome to all of you. it's a great privilege to have this conversation. i want to begin in south africa with charlene hunter-gault and have her set the scene with this national period of mourning and reflection and celebration. good morning, charlene. >> reporter: right now, david, it is pouring down rain, and in south africa rain is a sign of good for tutune, so maybe it is honor of mandela. up until this moment, people have been dancing in the streets, they've been singing songs, they've been recalling aspects of nelson ma
mandela, a special "meet the press" a special in-depth look at a world leader whose course and determination changed the course of world events. >> his journey from a prison to a president embodied the promise that human beings and countries can change for the better. >> his enduring power is that he showed us that there is true freedom and forgiveness. >> a look at mandela's life, his effect on u.s. politics and policy and how he handled controversy and criticism, all part of his enduring legacy. among my guests today, my colleague nbc news special correspondent tom brokaw, civil rights leader, the reverend jesse jackson and nbc news correspondent harry smith talks to author and poet maya angelou as she mourns a good friend. >> that's what he's brought, deliverance from ignorance. >> i'm david gregory. all of that ahead on "meet the press" from new york this morning, sunday, december 8th. . >> i'll have all that ahead on "meet the press," sunday, december 8. >>> the world's longest running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning. it is a d
mandela has passed away. >> it is a sad day but a day unfortunately we knew was coming as nelson mandela had been in failing health for some time and the news came from the current south african president jacob zuma who said and i quote here, "he is resting. he is now at peace. our nation has lost its greatest son. our people have lost a father." you're looking at some images of nelson mandela through the years really considered to be the father of modern south africa, a great unifier of both white and black south africans, spent 27 years as a political prisoner and in spite of that rose to become the president of the nation and as you can hear, people talk about his generous spirit. >> truly a symbol of peace and forgiveness as well. we have heard reports that he was with family and friends at his house last night when he passed away. some close family friends were also in johannesburg in south africa when he did. >> vinita nair has a look back at nelson mandela's life and legacy. >> and one wonders what must be passing through mr. mandela's mind at this moment. >> reporter: after 27 y
african president nelson mandela from 1994. his state of the nation address the year he was elected president. the first immense critically held elections in that country. minutes, your5 reaction and thoughts on the death of nelson mandela. if you're the eastern and central time zones, -- you can reach us on twitter. #is c-hest tag -- the span chat. the white house tweeted out this comment. rest in peace, nelson mandela. that is a picture from his visit to south africa. a number of remarks and comments from other politicians and statesmen as well. former presidents. jimmy carter sending a statement that reads rosalynn and i are of nelsony the death mandela. -- that is from jimmy carter. let's go to your calls. go ahead. jacksonville florida? sonia inove on to tampa. caller: the world is saddened. we have lost an example of what a man and what a person who cares and was able to forgive. he really led by example. is, why did we leave him in prison so long, and not try to free him in the 20 years that he was in prison? to come out forgive, and not focus on that is something people shou
>> rose: welcome to the program, tonight we remember nelson mandela, who died in south africa at age 95, joining me the former mayor of new york, david dinkins, the former editor of time magazine who wrote a biography on nelson mandela, stengel and his long time friend, jerry inzerillo. >> it was his genetic endowment what he learned in that moment of time. the great walter zulu who was really his mentor once told me a lovely story when young nelson mandela who first came to johannesburg to study law walked into zulu ice real estate office in soweto we were just trying to become a mass movement and one day a mass leader walked into my office. >> rose: also part of this program, a conversation with nelson mandela which took place here on this program in 1993. >> and the lesson is that the method of the people, the method of political method to be used, part determined by the oppressor himself, if the oppres oppressos peaceful means, we will never result to violence. it is when the oppressor in addition to repressive policies uses violence that the oppress have had no alternati
belongs to the ages. >> nelson mandela. revolutionary, president, prisoner. and prophet. >> sometimes, it falls bonn a generation to be great. let your greatness blossom. >> this morning, how he transformed our world. the lessons for our politics today. and a look back at his remarkable interview with ted koppel, just days after leaving prison. >> to spend 27 years, at the prime of your life, is a trag y tragedy. >> then -- >> we can't survive -- >> from wendy's to the white house. america debates inequality, growth, and fairness. we tackle it with two key senators, plus james carville and mary matalin join our powerhouse round table. right here, this sunday morning. >>> from abc news, "this week" with george stephanopoulos starts right now. >>> hello, again. in south africa today, preparations for the most massive memorial service in memory. pope francis, four american presidents, the dalai lama and dozens of world leaders will be there tuesday to pay tribute to a giant of our time. we'll reflect on nelson mandela this morning. first, let's go to chief foreign correspondent terry mo
:00. >>> there is mr. nelson mandela a free man taking his first steps into a new south africa. >> south africa and the world mourns the loss of a hero and an icon. nelson mandela was 95. he spent decades fighting apartheid in his native south africa. >> i'm anne makovec live in the newsroom. as the world remembers mandela, we here in the bay area remember his-historic visit to the east bay and congressional legislation and divesting in south africa. >> reporter: bundle up. it is still cold out here. i'm kiet do. we have a live report. >>> yeah, freezing temperatures again around the bay area. freeze warnings are up. what a chilly day. this is the third day in a row of freezing temperatures showing up outside. some of those numbers dropping off under clear skies this morning into the 20s and 30s. now 23 in santa rosa. 28 in concord. 39 in san francisco. and 30 degrees in livermore. so a very cold start to the day again freeze warnings until 9:00. then clouds roll in in the middle of the day. plan on highs only in the 40s and 50s. this afternoon we could see a little rain. and then tonight, cold
mandela in just a moment. but there is some breaking news this morning on two fronts, afghanistan and iran. we want to go first to liz palmer who is just arrived in tehran. >> the first big milestone in the post geneva era of nuclear cooperation between iran and the west have been passed, bob. there is a highly controversial reactor outside of tehran which could in the end produce plutonium which could be used for a bomb. it's been off limits to the international agency inspectors, but today they were allowed access to the site. i should stress that this deal, this cooperative deal is not universally popular here in iran. the president gave a big speech at a university yesterday and he was heckled by hardliners who really feel as if his reformist government has sold out. he was also heckled by students who want more reforms, political and economic and they want them faster. which really underlines how he is going to have to tread a very clever, diplomatic path from here on in. >> schieffer: all right. liz palmer, this story is going to go on all week, we know you'll keep us posted as it u
admirerers are mourning the passing of nelson mandela -a pact was felt arou >>> your realtime captioner is mrs. linda m. macdonald. >>> world leaders and millions of admirers are mourning the passing of nelson mandela, a man whose impact was felt around the globe including right here in the bay area. good afternoon, i'm michelle griego. a day after the death of nelson mandela, much of the world has paused to reflect on his legacy and also his accomplishments. cbs reporter tara mergener is live in washington with more. >> reporter: mandela was an international icon. today millions are mourning his passing and celebrating his remarkable life. the flag is after half-staff at the south african embassy in washington. outside his home in johannesburg, mourners are gathering to remember the man they called madiba. a memorial service will be held tuesday and the outpouring of love says something with the caliber of the man who led the country out of apartheid. >> we'll always love madiba for teaching us that it is possible to overcome hatred and anger to build a new nation. >> reporte
. first understanding the impact and importance of president nelson mandela. >> i pledge to use all my strength and ability to live up to expectations. we are going forward. our noorch freedom is irreversible. we must not allow fear to stand in our way. >> good morning. i'm melissa harris-perry. the world lost one of its greatest leaders and agents of social change with the passing of nelson mandela at the age of 95 on thursday. madiba, the clan name by which he was known, transcended the boundaries of south africa as it became synonymous with the country's greatest struggles and triumphs. mandela meant many things to many people, including president obama, who offered this tribute shortly after mandela's death. >> for now, let us pause and give thanks for the fact that nelson mandela lived, a man who took history in his hands and bent the arc of the moral universe towards justice. >> no one can deny the indelible contributions and sacrifices that nelson mandela made and for the people of south africa and ultimately the world. but often when a great leader passes on, what we think we k
mandela. >> ten minutes to 9:00, three hours ago, a great deal of activity over the past few hours. family members reported here. some reports of a priest arri arriving earlier today. yet, there was so much confusion. two of his daughters are in london tonight at a film premier. the premier, the royal premier of the movie about the life of nelson mandela's long walk to freedom. in the last few minutes, the president of south africa went on television and addressed the nation. it's incredibly late. most people will hear this news when they wake up in the morning. he broke the news and broke the hearts of millions and millions of south africans here. he's the father of the nation. he's the man who made modern south africa and gave 27 years of his life in prison. much of it spent on robin island. he is the icon, he is the man who symbolizes the transition from repression, racial segregation to democracy here. he is more than a father to this nation. he really em bodies the entire spirit of it. so many people here will be reflecting on that life and today reflecting on their own lives, how far
mandela. president obama and first lady michelle obama departed on air force one just a short time ago. tomorrow's memorial service will also serve as a rare reunion for nearly all of the living american presidents. >>> kpix5cate courigan is in the news room. a real security challenge. >> reporter: 8000 mourners are expected to attend the memorial and authorities say thousands of police officers will be on hand. right now, a memorial outside of mandela's former home is growing as well as a crowd of south africa's that have come together since the death. >> police are preparing today for a memorial service for nelson mandela at a johannesburg soccer stadium. president obama leaves this morning for south africa where he'll attend the massive public memorial. former president's bush, clinton and carter will also be in attendance along with more than 50 heads of state, making it one of the largest gatherings of world leaders in recent history. >> this is a test for us. >> reporter: the head of south africa's national defense force says the country is prepared for the challenge of equipping
, song, and remembrance in honor of nelson mandela. today's national day of prayer and reflection marks the beginning of a week-long program of mourning in his memory. let's go right now to nbc's michelle koh zin ski, who's in the middle of it all. michelle, a good evening your time. what are we seeing? >> reporter: hi, alex. right here this was a fence lined with some flowers outside the mandela property. now it has become several large hills full of flowers lined with people. you can imagine in churches around the world today mandela was mentioned. here today people were basically encouraged to do their own thing, to reflect on the melgszage of this champion of freedom. but in enormous numbers, people felt much better gathering together, includingmembers of mandela's family. it had the feeling of a sunday revival. here a few hundred gathered in a tent at mandela's offices, anything but quietly reflective, full of joy. >> we don't mourn quiet. we need to celebrate. we need to celebrate his life. >> reporter: the gospel choir that performed so many times for mandela in life, felt his lo
'll go live to dallas, one of the hardest-hit areas. >>> and south africa prepares to bury nelson mandela. we'll talk with martin luther king iii. he'll tell us about his memories of meeting mandela and the shared legacy with his own father. >>> let's begin this hour with merrill newman, an elderly u.s. war veteran dragged off a plane and then locked up in north korea and is now free after six weeks held without any real explanation. he was suddenly released overnight by the communist country. north korea calling it a, quote, deportation. joining me now, cnn correspondent dan simon. he's at the airport in san francisco awaiting newman's arrival, about when he is expected to arrive, and this is some journey, isn't it? >> reporter: it really is, fredricka. and it's really important we remind our viewers of the nature of the situation. this is an 85-year-old with a heart condition who had been held in north korea since october, and no one knew what was going to happen to him until he was suddenly released by the government last night. he is expected to land in about an hour from now. behind
, but we begin this morning with our top story. nelson mandela spent 27 years in prison, led his country to democracy and became its first black president. he died at home yesterday at the age of 95. chris takes a look at mandela's life and legacy. >> history books will remember nelson mandela as one of the world' most prominent crusaders for black rights, the son of an african tribal chief, nelson mandela gave up a comfortable life and his hereditary lights to be a tribal leader to become a political activist in the fight against apartheid. the system of white rule over the majority black population. >> to feel that it is for us to continue talking nonviolence and peace. >> he was jailed for organizing demonstrations as well as treason and sabotage. he spent 27 years behind bars, but his jailing fueled the fires of freedom. his plight became an international symbol of oppression. international businesses boycotted south africa until the government finally relented and released mandela in 1990. the famous prisoner instantly became a superstar who energized the people and became the first
, president obama heading to south africa where crowds are mourning and celebrating nelson mandela. we'll have a live report on the president's expected role in tomorrow's public memorial service. >>> and right now, 85-year-old merrill newman resting at his home in california after spending more than a month in captivity in north korea. he's also sharing new details about his ordeal, including the menu. hello, i'm wolf blitzer reporting today from washington. it doesn't seem to matter where you are in the united states today. we all have one thing in common. pretty much miserable weather. if you're headed to the airport, pag your patience. more than a thousand flights already have been canceled today. on the roads, it's no better. this was the scene in yonkers, outside new york city. police say 30 people were injured in a 24-plus car pile-up on the bronx river parkway late last night. one reminder, falling ice posing a huge threat. a sheet of melting ice fell to the ground in plano, texas, damaging at least eight parked cars. thankfully no people were on street at the time. cnn is covering all
of south africa where revered apartheid icon nelson mandela has passed away. he was 95 years old. the country's president just announced to the world how the former leader passed away. it was peacefully at his home. mandela of course inspired generations of politicians and activists. president obama will be making a statement on his passing shortly. when that happens we'll take it live. very sad. more "money" after this. ♪ [ male announcer ] they are a glowing example of what it means to the bst. and at this special time of year, they shine even brighter. come to the winter event and get the merces-benz you've always wished for, now for an exceptional price. [anta ] ho, ho, ho, ho! [ le announcer ] lease e 2014 e350 for $579 a month at your local mercedes-benz dealer. melissa: are you ready to "deck the halls" again? today we've got some coolest things for your holiday gift list. i'm telling you that you will want these things for yourself. i know i already do. here to talk us through it tech buffalo's todd hazelton. >> thanks for having me. melissa: this is amazing! i want it
planned. our hearts are with nelson mandela who died at 95. he was jailed for nearly three decades fighting against apartheid. we'll follow the story at the fox news channel. we are learning more and more about what a disaster obama care is. millions are learning they cannot keep the doctors they have on their insurance plan. they were promised they could but they can't. the website is such a mess people can't sign up. it is plagued with huge security risks and we are left with no choice. this law has to be repealed, replaced and like they did when they were selling the disastrous low to the american people, democrat democrats are lying again to save the law. they say republicans have no solutions. the republicans do have an alternative plan. it could save $2 trillion over ten years. we want you to join the conversation. log onto our facebook page. reince priebus is with us. >> thank you for having me on. you rattled off a bunch of problems just to name a few. >> just to name a few. but the president challenged republicans. i think this was a chase the rabbit trying to divert atten
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)